Fab Food Friday Fotos: Caramel Pound Cake, Kiam Peng, GF Artichoke Quiche, Black Bean Burgers, Summer Potato Salad, DIY Whiskey Jerky, Pork with Apples, Squash Risotto, Pumpkin Popcorn Balls, Lemon-Garlic Shrimp & Grits, Split Pea Soup, More Thrifty Recipes « Frugal Café Blog Zone

Fab Food Friday Fotos: Caramel Pound Cake, Kiam Peng, GF Artichoke Quiche, Black Bean Burgers, Summer Potato Salad, DIY Whiskey Jerky, Pork with Apples, Squash Risotto, Pumpkin Popcorn Balls, Lemon-Garlic Shrimp & Grits, Split Pea Soup, More Thrifty Recipes

Posted By on September 18, 2015

“Every meal should end with something sweet. Maybe it’s jelly on toast at breakfast, or a small piece of chocolate at dinner – but it always helps my brain bring a close to the meal.”

~ Robert Irvine, British celebrity chef

FOOD. GLORIOUS FOOD.

Friday is here!

When they’re available, recipes and recipe links will accompany select “Fab Food Friday Fotos,” with a guarantee that at least one frugal-minded recipe will always be included.

 

Caramel Pound Cake | Photo credit: s4's world, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Caramel Pound Cake | Photo credit: s4’s world, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

If, like Chef Robert Irvine suggests in today’s food quote, you want to conclude a meal with something sweet, consider this fabulous Caramel Pound Cake. The recipe that photographer/cook s4’s world used is posted at Kothiyavunu.

 

Check out the “Skewing Around” post at Tasting Table for more info and recipes — intro:

The history of people using sticks, metal rods and skewers to grill food over an open fire is an old one. The experience is primitive, intoxicating and, at times, barbaric. Skewers evoke all the senses.

And the tradition will never go away, because it’s quick, easy and ideal for entertaining. Think about it: You put something on a stick—a piece of meat, seafood or vegetable—season it with some spices and put it over a fire. It’s cooking at its most fundamental.

 

Super-quick and easy, these ham, egg, and Brie toasted muffins are perfect for breakfast, lunch, or dinner — the recipe is posted at the Waitrose website.

 

Summer Potato Salad | Photo credit: Thomas Cizauskas, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Summer Potato Salad | Photo credit: Thomas Cizauskas, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photographer/cook Thomas Cizauskas shared his summer potato salad recipe:

Summer Potato Salad

* 2 pounds large Yukon Gold potatoes
* 2 tablespoons malt vinegar
* 1/3 cup vegetable stock or potato-cooking water
* 1 cup vegan mayonnaise (such as non-soy Just Mayo)

EXTRAS
* 2/3 cup finely chopped onion
* 1/2 cup finely chopped celery
* 3 radishes, roughly chopped
* 3 TBSP finely chopped dill pickle
* 3 TBSP chopped fresh scallions
* 1 TBSP capers
* 1 tsp ground white pepper
* 1 tsp ground mustard
* 1 tsp turmeric
* 1 tsp Liquid Smoke
* 1 tsp Smoked Paprika
* Kosher salt, to taste

GARNISH
* Crisp whole red-leaf lettuce leaves
* Thinly sliced radishes
* Chopped scallion greens

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PROCEDURE

Peel the potatoes and slice each one lengthwise in half, or in quarters if very large; then cut crosswise into half-round or quarter-round slices, about 1/2 inch thick.

Put the slices in a saucepan with water just to cover and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt per quart of water. Bring water to a boil, and reduce to a simmer, uncovered. Cook the potatoes for 5 to 6 minutes, checking with a fork for cooked through, but still firm. Check frequently. DO NOT OVERCOOK.

Immediately remove from the heat and drain the potatoes into a colander, but save a cup of the cooking liquid for dressing the potatoes.

Add the malt vinegar to 1/3 cup of vegetable stock or the reserved potato water. Transfer the potatoes to a mixing bowl. Drizzle the vinegar/stock over the potato pieces, turning them gently to distribute evenly. Let sit 10 minutes to absorb the liquid.

Add potatoes to colander. Strain out any remaining liquid.

Return to mixing bowl. Add the onion, celery, pickle, scallions (reserving some for the garnish), capers, Liquid Smoke, and spices (minus the paprika and salt). Toss. Top with 2/3 cup of mayonnaise and, with a large rubber spatula, gently fold everything together until well blended. Taste the salad and add more salt, pepper, mayonnaise, or vinegar/stock as needed.

Cover the salad and set aside in the refrigerator for at least an hour or so before serving. If it is refrigerated longer, let it come back to room temperature before serving.

To serve, line a bowl or a platter with red-leaf lettuce, and mound the salad on top. Decorate at the last moment with radish slices, chopped scallion greens, and a couple of dashes of smoked paprika.

 

Description of this awesome, gluten-free artichoke quiche, from Health.com:

This quiche has a cheesy rice crust instead of a pastry crust, so not only is it a hearty meatless main dish, it’s also gluten free.

Artichokes are becoming more and more popular, and people add them to all sorts of things like pasta and pizza and dips. They’re rich in folate, which helps keep the heart healthy and in potassium, which helps with muscle function.

 

The how-to video for making Thai Green Curry, embedded in the tweet above, is from the Frugal Chef.

 

Squash Risotto | Photo credit: Amy Ross, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Squash Risotto | Photo credit: Amy Ross, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photographer/cook Amy Ross has shared her squash risotto recipe below:

What I did:

First halve, seed, and roast squash with butter at 350 deg F. for about 50 minutes or until soft. Let cool, then peel.

Melt butter and oil in a pot, saute an onion until it’s translucent. Then add walnuts and shredded sage, toast lightly. Add risotto, toast grains. Add a cup of white wine, stir until absorbed.

Gradually add hot saffron bouillon a cup at a time and stir until absorbed. Continue until the rice is soft. Then add a bunch of Parmesan cheese, salt, pepper, and serve.

What I would change:
The saffron broth wasn’t salty like most broths, so I had to add a lot of salt. next time I might use chicken or pork broth. possibly toast the walnuts and sage separately and add later. Pancetta would be nice! pumpkin would work for this, too.

 

Recipe intro from Pop Sugar:

Fluffy quinoa is tossed with roasted petite roma tomatoes, sautéed shallots and garlic, chopped basil, and grated mozzarella cheese. This heavenly mixture is topped with slices of juicy beefsteak tomatoes and fresh mozzarella then baked to beautiful, bubbling perfection. Fresh basil and a drizzle of sweet and tangy balsamic reduction are the finishing touches on this masterpiece.

This caprese quinoa bake is a satisfying vegetarian meal, but you can always bulk it up with some meat. I like to serve it with some chicken paillard, but it would be equally delightful with a good steak or some garlicky grilled shrimp. You do you.

 

This Lemon-Garlic and Grits dish takes only about 30 minutes to make — it is the most popular recipe of the week at Food Network.

 

Apple-Cinnamon Dessert | Photo credit: Sunny Mama, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Apple-Cinnamon Dessert | Photo credit: Sunny Mama, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photographer/cook Sunny Mama’s recipe for this apple-cinnamon dessert, inspired by Dutch apple pie, is available at Hallo Sunny! The recipe and website text are in Dutch, and can be easily translated.

 

Intro from The Kitchn:

After making a big batch of preserved lemons a few months ago, I realized I’d need to figure out some ways to use them up! This recipe a new favorite — it’s a riff on a classic Middle Eastern tagine of slow-cooked chicken, artichokes, and preserved lemon, but cooked in a regular baking dish instead of the classic tagine baking dish. If you’re looking for a recipe to warm your kitchen and fill your home with the mouthwatering aromas, this is the one.

 

Kiam Peng (Salty/Savoury Rice in Rice Cooker) | Photo credit: Jasline @ Foodie Baker, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Kiam Peng (Salty/Savoury Rice in Rice Cooker) | Photo credit: Jasline @ Foodie Baker, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photographer/cook Jasline’s recipe for kiam peng, a frugal, savory rice dish with meat, is posted at Foodie Baker — background info and cooking tips:

If your family owns a rice cooker, then your mom may have made this one-pot throw-everything-in Kiam Peng before.

Kiam Peng is a term in Hokkien, which literally translates to Salty Rice. It is made by combining uncooked rice, meat, vegetables and seasoning like soy sauce, sesame oil and oyster sauce in a rice cooker pot and then let the rice cooker do the job.

The meat can be chicken, pork, ham, luncheon meat, lup cheong (a dried, smoky, sweet and salty pork sausage) or salted fish while the vegetables can be carrots, cabbage, long beans, corn, peas, mushrooms etc – the variations are endless! The only thing to take note is to add slightly lesser water than stipulated by the rice cooker so that the rice is cooked but not mushy.

My mom prepares her Kiam Peng with chopped chicken drumsticks, long beans and lup cheong, and I would always tell her to cook more because without fail, I would scoop a double serving for dinner that night. Yum!

For my version of Kiam Peng, I wanted to throw in whatever I could find in my refrigerator – hence you are seeing cabbage, mushrooms, French beans and carrots popping up. Boneless chicken thighs are used so that X will not complain about having to pick out the bones and I’ve also did some sautéing first to add more flavour to the rice.

 

Fresh Croatian Cheese, Split Farmers' Market, Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia | Photo credit: Let Ideas Compete, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Fresh Croatian Cheese, Split Farmers’ Market, Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia | Photo credit: Let Ideas Compete, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

 

Summary, from Esquire:

Most people think of jerky as gas station bounty: tasteless, chewy, and wrapped in cheap plastic. But Pamela Braun, a Dallas-based cook, makes far better road food. The author of Jerky Everything (The Countryman Press), out August 3, is all about healthy proteins with in-your-face flavor, such as duck à l’orange and balsamic pork jerky. And that’s just the beginning of the stuff that she “jerkies”— game, fish, and veggies can be “jerkied,” too. Here, Braun explains how to make whiskey jerky, a savory-sweet snack that puts Slim Jim to shame.

 

Ginger Tofu Pizza | Photo credit: Iris, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Ginger Tofu Pizza | Photo credit: Iris, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photographer/cook Iris provided the ginger tofu pizza recipe link and this summary — from Bring Your Own Vegetables:

This ginger tofu pizza was adapted from Sunset Magazine’s Ginger Chicken Pizza Recipe. I have a thing for ginger, but we went a bit overboard this time. Sometimes less is more, and sometimes more is BURNING.

 

Save money and cut-down on waste by trying this black bean burger recipe — recipe is posted at Cleverly Simple, with this overview:

There is nothing quite like a fresh cooked beef patty on a soft bun with all the fixin’s, right?…except… what?! That’s a black bean burger!? Yep, black bean burgers are truly a phenomenon. They look and feel just like a beef burger and can be topped exactly the same way. The taste, you ask? Delicious. No, they don’t taste exactly like beef, but they carry a fresh and wonderful flavor of their own. My father-in-law is as “meat and potatoes” as you can get. I don’t even think I’ve ever seen him eat a salad. When he was visiting a few weeks ago, I served these burgers and told him that if he didn’t like it, I could make him a deli sandwich. Well, my friends, he not only ate the whole burger, he voluntarily ate half of another burger and said {quote} these are good {end quote} …Wow. Words of gold coming from a man who rarely comments on a meal!

The original black bean burger recipe came from a friend who got it from a cooking magazine, but oh how it has morphed over the years! I have added five ingredients and changed up the proportions until our family found the perfect substitute for a beef burger. Aside from the taste, my favorite thing about these black bean burgers is that they are soooo inexpensive. With one can of organic black beans mixed up with some common ingredients, I can make 4 burgers for less than $3.00… and unlike beef, there is no “shrinkage” when you cook the burger.

 

Easy, flavorful salad made of pork tenderloin and goat cheese — check out the recipe at Food Lover’s Market.

 

Spaghetti Squash with Turkey Meatballs & Spinach | Photo credit: Tracy Benjamin, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Spaghetti Squash with Turkey Meatballs & Spinach | Photo credit: Tracy Benjamin, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

You’ll find this tasty Spaghetti Squash with Turkey Meatballs & Spinach recipe posted at Shutterbean — here is webmistress/cook/photographer Tracy Benjamin’s quick overview:

I have a confession to make. The only reason I tried this recipe was because I was seduced by the magical powers of sprinkled Parmesan cheese on top of meatballs. The bright yellow spaghetti squash intrigued me and I knew the mushroom/spinach profile would be good, but MEAT & CHEESE sold me. I loooove meatballs. I’m 1/2 Italian. It’s in my genetic makeup. My grandma’s meatballs are what broke my 3 years of Vegetarianism. Seriously.

 

Halloween will be here before you know it — the recipe for these whimsical pumpkin popcorn balls is available at Mom On Timeout.

 

Heirloom Tomatoes and Basil, Farmers' Market, Ferry Building, San Francisco | Photo credit: advencap, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Heirloom Tomatoes and Basil, Farmers’ Market, Ferry Building, San Francisco | Photo credit: advencap, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

 

The recipe for this hearty and quick pork dish with apples is posted at Cook with M & S.

 

Japanese Foods, from "My Japanese Table" | Photo credit: Sheri Chen, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Japanese Foods, from “My Japanese Table” | Photo credit: Sheri Chen, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

More info and photos from webmistress/cook Sheri Chen are posted at Happy Little Bento:

I was asked by someone at a publishing company to review a few cookbooks that they thought would be of interest to me. I read through them and this one caught my attention first. It’s called My Japanese Table, by Debra Samuels. The author is an American woman who found herself living in Japan for several years throughout her adult life, and became enamored of Japanese cooking while there. This book contains general staples as well as a selection of various types of dishes suitable for home cooking and bento. I made a few recipes from her book.

The first one I tried was her recipe for sweet and spicy celery salad. It is a simple recipe, with only a few ingredients for making the sauce. It came out a little darker than her picture in the book, but it was tasty and the kids liked it.

Click here to read the entire post at Happy Little Bento and to see more beautiful photos.

 

 

Thrift Sale Find: Vintage Mid-Century Modern Nordic Mint Teapot | Photo credit: ancient history, Filckr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Thrift Sale Find: Vintage Mid-Century Modern Nordic Mint Teapot | Photo credit: ancient history, Filckr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

 

Thrifty and delicious recipe for comforting homemade split pea soup:

Are you looking for a great and simple split pea soup recipe? As far as I’m concerned, no soup has more history. Its roots date back to as early as 400 BC when the Greeks and Romans were selling hot pea soup in the streets. Now, thousands of years later, it is still a popular dish enjoyed by people all over the world. The Germans eat it with sausage, the Dutch make it with celery and the Canadians often top it with dumplings. Whatever recipe, the main ingredient remains the same – dried yellow or green split peas.

There are several things I really like about this soup. First of all, it is very flavorful! The peas are rinsed and simmered alongside other vegetables and seasonings in a broth made from meat/bones or a simple vegetable broth. Just to prove how delicious this soup is, allow me to talk about my husband for a moment. He is not picky and enjoys most any food put in front of him, but ever since he was a kid, he’s never cared for peas … yet, he loves split pea soup!? Secondly, the soup can be made in about an hour from start to finish. Unlike dried beans, peas do not need to be soaked overnight. They are merely rinsed and cooked alongside the other ingredients for 45 minutes on the stove. As a matter of fact, this soup is so simple that it is the main soup served year round in the Polish military! Homemade split pea soup is also very inexpensive. You can buy a pound of dried peas for less than $2 at the grocery store. The other ingredients are probably already in your pantry!

 

Vintage Ad, A&P Coffee, Woman's Day, March 1953 | Photo credit: Vicki McClure Davidson, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Vintage Ad, A&P Coffee, Woman’s Day, March 1953 | Photo credit: Vicki McClure Davidson, Flickr, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

 

Food photos selected and posted are credited and have Creative Commons-licensed content with some rights reserved for noncommercial purposes, unless otherwise noted.

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Past two months of Fab Food Friday Fotos posts:

Italian Sausage & Lentils with Potatoes, Pasta with Brussels Sprouts & Pancetta, One Pot Roast Italian Chicken, Creamed Zucchini, GF Almond Tea Bread, Avocado-Corn Salsa, "Skinny" Italian Chocolate Shake, Chinese-Style Eggplant, Rhubarb Butter, More Easy Recipes

Korean Keema, Eton Mess, Peanut Chicken Soba Noodles, Street Tacos Al Pastor, Happy Squirrel Bento, Chunky Gazpacho, Beer-Battered Fish & British Chips, Jalapeño Popper Chicken Breasts, Bean Soup, Corn Fritters & Roasted Tomatoes, More Thrifty Recipes

Thai-Style Watermelon Salad, Curry-Masala Lamb Burgers, Totoro Sesame Tarts, Pork Tenderloin & Tomato-Peach Compote, Oven-Roasted Broccoli, Chicken Wings, Black Magic Chocolate Cake, Zucchini "Hash Browns" & Eggs, More Fab Recipes

Vietnamese Chicken Wings with Lemongrass Brown Rice, Easy Spaghetti Pie, Slow-Cooker Cider Beef Stew, Nut-Hugging Teddie Bear Cookies, Ground Turkey Dishes, Shakshuka, Key Lime Pie, GF Fish Sticks, BBQ Chickpea Salad, More Frugal Recipes

Lemon-Orange Ice Cream, Roast Pork Neck, GF Sweet Potato & Lime Taquitos, Easy Cheesecake, Chicken Adobo, Quick Black Beans, Country Breakfast Pizza, Thai Veggie Stew, Bacon Nachos, Rachael Ray’s Dandan Noodles, More Frugal Recipes

Cider Can Chicken, Makhlama Lahm, Herbed Salt, Beet & Leek Salad, GF Buttermilk Ranch Chicken Tenders, Kiwi Banana Ice Cream, Pan-Fried Salmon with Asian Glaze, Mango Mint Fizz, Vegan Fried Rice, More Thrifty Recipes

Beef-Pork Meatballs, Cherry Cucumber Coolers, Fried Fish Tacos, GF Apricot Chocolate Chip Cookies, Sauerkraut Pork Casserole, Eggplant Toast, Chilli Chicken Pasta, Garlic Dill Zucchini Pickles, Swedish Salmon Tart, More Fab Recipes

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About the author

I'm a conservative frugalist. My priorities: Watchdogging the government, making sure our tax dollars are spent wisely, living within our budgets (at home and in Washington, DC), and adhering to our Constitution and the conservative principles upon which it was developed by our founding fathers. Also, loving God, my family, and my country. Be wise, be frugal. God bless America!      

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